teenagers from around the world discuss politics, specifically for people who can't vote, on this biweekly podcast

A Post-Election Debrief from W.T.P. in D.C.

A Post-Election Debrief from W.T.P. in D.C.

... to the young people in particular, I hope you will hear this I have...spent my entire life fighting for what I believe in. I’ve had successes and setbacks and sometimes painful ones. Many of you are at the beginning of your professional, public, and political careers — you will have successes and setbacks too. This loss hurts, but please never stop believing that fighting for what’s right is worth it.
— Hillary Clinton, Concession Speech 2016

Last night, when I finally went to bed around 2 am, I felt as though my soul had been physically stomped on, crushed, and strangled. I watched the results roll in surrounded by friends in the common room of our dorms. Although the program I'm attending makes a point of not being a liberal echo chamber, sometimes it's impossible to control. That night groups of sobbing students gathered in circles, lamenting the loss. And it really did feel like a loss. It felt, at least to me, that we'd been so close to making history, to changing the world for the next generation of ambitious little girls. It felt like the glass ceiling was about to come crashing down. I had been so confident in the polls, the articles, the conversations I'd been having in the weeks leading up to the election. Hillary was going to win, I just knew it. In fact, in a quick journal entry I wrote around 8 pm that night, I said that there was no way I was wrong, that I wasn't nervous because I knew what was going to happen.

Looking back on the crushing sadness and disbelief I felt that night, I wonder about how I let myself get so deep into my liberal bubble. I've lived my entire life in New York City, one of the bluest places in the country. Both my parents voted for Obama in 2008 and 2012. I attend a school that, while not entirely liberal, does have a bias towards Hillary Clinton and most socially liberal ideologies. But that's not the only reason I hadn't even stopped to consider the reality of a Trump presidency before it happened. Every morning on my way to school I read three main news sources: The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist. Setting aside the fiscally conservative lean of the Journal, those three tend to be mostly liberal. I've willingly immersed myself in media sources that share my beliefs. I've created the ultimate circle of confirmation bias. 

In this episode of WTP we try to look to the future, to look past the divisiveness of the campaign season, the protests of the past couple weeks, and the constant slew of Facebook posts tearing down the supposed cabinet members announced in the upcoming months. It's often difficult to look past your side's beliefs and acknowledge the truths of those opposing you. We try to do that here. Let us know how you think we did at wethepplpodcast@gmail.com or by messaging @wethepplpodcast on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter. 

Hope you have a great Thanksgiving.

Regards,

Zora

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